Come alive with Corita Kent

Also known as Sister Mary Corita, Corita Kent (1918–1986) was a nun, educator, artist and social activist. A member of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (a progressive Catholic order based in Los Angeles), Kent used screenprinting as a vehicle through which to deliver messages of protest and peace.

In the 1960s Kent’s work became increasingly political. Her vibrant, text-based prints voiced support for the civil rights movement and protested America’s involvement in the conflict in Vietnam. One wonders which contemporary causes Kent would lend her voice to now, and what she might have to say about the current state of our world.

Corita Kent, Come alive

Corita Kent come alive 1967. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, Manflowers

Corita Kent manflowers 1969. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, Harness the sun

Corita Kent harness the sun 1967. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, Handle with care

Corita Kent handle with care 1967. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, News of the week

Corita Kent news of the week 1969. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, King's dream

Corita Kent king’s dream 1969. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, The handling is in your hands

Corita Kent the handling is in your hands 1966. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent

Corita Kent, Phil and Dan

Corita Kent phil and dan 1969. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Mervyn Horton Bequest Fund 2016. © Estate of Corita Kent